Posts By Alena

Camino Day 13 – Olveiroa to Finisterre (part 2)

After lunch at Cee, at the moment where laziness had reached its highest peak for the day, we started to climb up intensely. Camino Finisterre was tough on us, but, hey, no pain, no gain – the efforts made it up for the golden kilometres that followed…:)

Camino Finisterre

Camino Day 13 – Olveiroa to Finisterre (Part 1)

The last stage of our Camino – from Olveiroa to Finisterre is for me the most picturesque and inspiring part of the whole Camino. This statement, of course, is largely subjective, as I am deeply fond of the sea/ocean in every season and weather. Though, I am sure no one can remain untouched by nature’s beauty if he/she walks this particular part. It gives immense sense of freedom and I am greatly thankful that we chose to finish our Camino by walking all the way to Finisterre. The decision came quite naturally at the time, and, as it seemed, for a good reason. :)

Camino Finisterre

On the way to Finisterre

How do Camino de Santiago albergues look like?

Some of the Camino de Santiago albergues through my eyes.

More information about albergues here.

Camino-de-Santiago-1st-day

The garden of the albergue; it was nice and quiet, lots of trees heavy with apples and clothes horse heavy with laundry

Camino-de-Santiago-1st-day-Rabanal

First meeting with albergue bedrooms; then I found it crowded; after the albergue O’Cebreiro, I’d say it is almost intimate

 

Camino-de-Santiago-2nd-day-Molinaseca

Ready to explore the village & in front of the lovely albergue. Recommended.

ALBERGUE-DE-PEREGRINOS-AVE-FENIX

We arrived! Albergue Ave Fenix at the front.

ALBERGUE-DE-PEREGRINOS-AVE-FENIX

Albergue – bedroom – Villafranca del Bierzo

Galicia-O-Cebreiro

YES! We’ve made it to the albergue! O Cebreiro.

Galicia-O-Cebreiro-albergue

No privacy here. O Cebreiro

Albergue A horta de Abel

Albergue A horta de Abel from the outside. Triacastela.

Albergue A horta de Abel

Each room had its own bathroom – what luxury :) Triacastela

Albergue A horta de Abel

The room was really stylish and accommodated only 8 people

Albergue -Casa-Barbadelo

My favourite albergue. Barbadelo

Albergue -Casa-Barbadelo

Barbadelo

Albergue -Casa-Barbadelo

Albergue Casa Barbadelo

Gonzar Albergue

Albergue Casa Garcia Gonzar

Albergue O Cruceiro Melide

Albergue O Cruceiro – front view. Melide

Albergue O Cruceiro Melide

Albergue O Cruceiro Melide

Albergue O Cruceiro Melide

Kitchen!

Santa Irene

We’d met this one several times already :) Santa Irene.

Santa Irene

The albergue. Santa Irene.

The Last Stamp Albergue

Some cute details in the albergue. Santiago de Compostela.

Santiago de Compostela

Inside The Last Stamp albergue

Negreira

Albergue El Carmen. Negreira.

How do the Albergues look like - Albergue Horreo

Albergue Horreo. Olveiroa.

Camino Day 12 – Negreira to Olveiroa

To begin with, this was a looong day. 33 kilometres to Olveiroa. I do not think I had been as exhausted as I was that day when I was crawling towards the albergue.

The night was peaceful and the day started very quietly, something you can enjoy only in albergue rooms as slightly inhabited as ours. With only 8-9 people available and fresh air coming through the window all night, it was quite a refreshing experience. We had coffee con leches with some sort of croissants. I am not usually particularly hungry at that time of the day, but these sections of the Camino (from Santiago to Finisterre) are not only less crowded in terms of pilgrims, but the distances between villages can be substantial, especially if you are used to the French way, offering so many possibilities. So fewer villages, and, what’s more, many of them did not provide eating possibilities, supermercados, or anything like that. So, it’s a very very good idea that there is something nutritious in your backpack when walking the Camino Finisterre.

Leaving Negreira

Leaving Negreira before dawn

Albergues

Speaking of accommodation, there are several options one can choose from when walking/cycling the Camino. Hotels, hostels, and, of course, albergues. Note, however, that in some smaller villages, albergues are the only option available, sometimes only 1 or 2 of them to choose from (for example the village of Gonzar).

Albergues are an inseparable part of the true Camino experience. The socializing aspect is at its best there and for me the spirit of the journey can be predominantly felt there. Due to various reasons, some people choose other types of accommodation, but since I completely focused on albergues, I’d like to share some information with you and hopefully you will not have my confused expression when I first walked in an albergue and wondered how should things be done.

ALBERGUE-DE-PEREGRINOS-AVE-FENIX

Albergue – bedroom

Camino Day 11 – Santiago de Compostela to Negreira – Part 2

Continued from Part 1

There was some walking along the road (not my piece of cake for sure) but this time there was a sidewalk (on both sides!), so I didn’t mind. I was looking forward to the rapid climb I noticed on the map. It was so good not knowing what to expect the previous days. The pleasure of ignorance. :) Now, however, I was perfectly aware that it was 2 km at least and the thought was not really comforting.

We saw the guy on the horse again. He is taking it slowly, isn’t he? I would expect him to be twice as quick as we were, but instead he was moving roughly at our pace. The horse was not thrilled with the climb, either, I am almost sure of that.

Santiago to Negreira

Day 11 – Santiago de Compostela to Negreira – Part 1

After the hectic walk to Santiago the other day, setting off to Finisterre felt like a breath of fresh air and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The morning started in a perfectly relaxed mode, we pampered ourselves by sleeping until 8 o’clock and still were among the few people that left the albergue so early. To make things even better we decided to have a breakfast…about 5 meters after we walked out of the door. :)  This is what I call a promising start of the day. We ordered hot chocolate and churros (this is like the ultimate combination, churro being a fried-dough crunchy pastry) and the energy levels hit the roof of the bar we were in, which in turn looked so authentic, I would not be surprised if it looked exactly the same way a few centuries ago.

Churros and chocolate

Churros with chocolate

Camino Day 10 – Santa Irene to Santiago de Compostela – Part 2

Continued from Part 1.

We reached Santiago around noon and I was surprised how big the town actually was. We walked for a few kilometres before we reached the Cathedral, too late to see the the Botafumeiro though. The square in front of the cathedral was full with people – taking photos, laughing, sitting/lying on the ground, thinking, speaking, greeting, hugging. The cathedral itself was splendid in its style, details and size. Santiago was bursting with life – pilgrims, students (there is a university), tourists, locals. Very lively atmosphere, with gorgeous architecture and cozy, narrow streets. Lots of bars, restaurants, all sorts of places where you can sit and enjoy life. I was desperate to leave my rucksack somewhere, anywhere, change my clothes and soak in the sun. So much impatience! :) Probably that is why I had to wait a few more hours, lesson taught, whether learnt – still to be determined.

Santiago de Compostela

The Cathedral

Camino Day 10 – Santa Irene to Santiago de Compostela – Part 1

There it is – the day we were to reach Santiago de Compostela. Ahead of us were only about 22 km. – well deserved small walk after the last couple of days delivering more than 30 km. daily to our feet – interesting how people’s attitude to distance changes :) . Was I excited that I would finally reach it? Yes, but perhaps not to the extend some people do, simply because for me the end was Finisterre and watching the sun go down over the ocean. Nonetheless, I was really thrilled, curious and impatient to see the place which has been the destination point of pilgrimage for centuries.

So off we went…

Last day to Santiago

Age variety

Camino Day 9 – Melide to Santa Irene

Day 9 was one of those days which have not left a very memorable trace in my mind. But there should be days like that, just getting in the routine of walking, which isn’t bad at all. It was a flat, long walk (over 30 km…again) with grumpy weather but considering we had to reach Santiago de Compostela the next day (already?!), we preferred to walk more that day and treat ourselves with a pleasurable short walk for the last day.

Leaving Melide

Leaving Melide